Crocker Jacob- The Exposition of the Samaritan’s Example

Michael Gerber claims that the start of a great marketing campaign is understanding, “how your customers’ minds work, and how you can influence them for their benefit and yours” (Gerber, 2005, 136). Luke tells the reader, “But a Samaritan, as he traveled, came where the man was; and when he saw him he took pity on him” (Luke 10:33). To understand the marketplace one must be engaged and accessible to the marketplace. The Samaritan is found in the heart of his client’s need. When others have overlooked any potential in this beaten and bruised body, even walking to the other side of the road (Levite and Priest), the Samaritan was close enough to the action to recognize a need. For further information regarding this, feel free to visit them at crocker jacob

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The Samaritan did not stop at recognizing a potential need. He stepped into the action, and applied his skills where they were needed. “He went to him to bandaged his wounds, pouring on oil and wine. Then he put the man on his own donkey, took him to an inn and took care of him” (Luke 10:34). Marketing is not something you do to someone, its something you do for someone. The Samaritan recognized customer service is step one but quickly analyzed the needs of his newest client and began moving to the customer focused needs. The Samaritan was holding another key of good market analysis, first mover advantage. “The company that grabs the most market share the fastest wins the battle and the war” (Sherman, 2001, 5).

Although the traveler did not represent the most difficult sales prospect, imagine the customer relations the Samaritan was building. Rejected by “his kind” the Samaritan was breaking old paradigms and plowing new ground. Marketers can do the same by staying aware of their surroundings looking for opportunities that others look over. Marketers should consider themselves as Swindoll says consider themselves “not a superstar, but a servant” (Swindoll, 1981, 26). The Samaritan was not finished. The best customer service coupled with the finest market analysis is meaningless unless there is follow through. In the case of the Samaritan, his failure to act would have left him no different than the priest and the Levite. Without follow through, marketers are no different than the thousand of other businesses and entrepreneurs vying for business. The Samaritan’s quest continued, “The next day he took out two silver coins and gave them to the inn keeper. ‘Look after him,’ he said, ‘and when I return, I will reimburse you for the extra expense you may have'” (Luke 10:35). Finally, the Samaritan was willing to pay a price for follow through. Marketers must be willing to make an investment for their customers.